Monthly Archives: November 2019

A week in review, 2019-W45

Wrote

None

Read

  1. David Browne, In the Room at Nirvana’s ‘MTV Unplugged in New York’, Rolling Stone (2019-11-01).
  2. R. Du Toit Strauss, Voyager 2 enters interstellar space, Nature Astronomy (2019-11-04).
  3. Mary Cain, I Was the Fastest Girl in America, Until I Joined Nike, The New York Times (2019-11-07).
  4. David Ferguson, Find The Thing You're Most Passionate About, Then Do It On Nights And Weekends For The Rest Of Your Life, The Onion (2013-03-20).
  5. Ernie Smith, The Car Cassette Adapter Was an Unsung Hero at the Dawn of the Digital Age, Motherboard (2019-11-06).

Listened

  1. Live Episode! Luke's Lobster: Luke Holden and Ben Conniff, How I Built This (2019-11-07).
  2. Atari's Nolan Bushnell: "I started tinkering in third grade and never stopped, Danny in the Valley (2019-11-02).
  3. Philanthropy in China, with Scott Kennedy of CSIS, Sinica Podcast (2019-11-07).

Photo

Upcoming


There might be additional links that didn't make the cut at notes.kirkkittell.com

A week in review, 2019-W44

Wrote

  1. We serve good mornings all day (2019-10-28).
  2. Three views of Lago Maggiore (2019-10-30).
  3. Sit back, relax, and enjoy the flight (2019-11-02).

Read

  1. Dan Piepenbring, The Book of Prince, The New Yorker (2019-09-09). He paused for a moment. "We need to find a word for what funk is,"" he said. Funk music, which fused impulse to structure, was the living contradiction he embodied: his mother and his father in one.
  2. Grayson Haver Currin, Bob Dylan: Time Out of Mind, Pitchfork (2018-05-13). During the '90s, he issued two solo acoustic albums of earnest, sometimes poignant renditions of American standards, delighting those who had pined for the lost days of the folk kid from Greenwich Village. But coffeehouse covers hadn't made Dylan a spark of resistance in the '60s or a source of bittersweet reckonings with reality in the '70s. He had become a legacy act, accruing lifetime achievement laurels and touring his hits for Boomers in khakis. Possibly for the first time in his career, Dylan was beginning to blend into the scenery.
  3. Charles Duhigg, What Google Learned From Its Quest to Build the Perfect Team, The New York Times (2016-02-28). (notes) Project Aristotle is a reminder that when companies try to optimize everything, it's sometimes easy to forget that success is often built on experiences — like emotional interactions and complicated conversations and discussions of who we want to be and how our teammates make us feel — that can't really be optimized.
  4. Dan Catchpole, Boeing's CEO Says Its Culture Will Fix Its Problems. Experts Say It May Be to Blame, Forbes (2019-10-31).
  5. Andrew Gill, How to get started in homebrewing, from the pros who mastered it, The Takeout (2019-06-25). However your beer comes out, Randy Mosher says you'll be a practitioner in a most intimate form of art. "You're making something that other people are putting in their bodies and the sensations of aroma and taste and flavor go into some of the more emotional and primitive parts of our brains. So you have this ability to really reach out and affect people in really deep ways with flavor. For me, that's the magic of beer: being able to kind of get inside there and mess with people's heads a bit."

Listened

None

Watched

None

Photo

Le France renaissante

Upcoming


There might be additional links that didn't make the cut at notes.kirkkittell.com

Sit back, relax, and enjoy the flight

Flying is de rigeur now. Has been. I don't notice so much the outside of the plane--the environment through and over which we're hurtling. No more counting grain elevators until they're flat with the perspective. No more noticing the creeks and rovers like fire as they briefly reflect the sun. No more naming the features down below. Looking out the window, when it happens, is just to watch the flight surfaces trim slowly back and forth. (Until it's speed brake time.)

It's all still there if you want it. The magic or wonder of those first (many) flights isn't really replaced by anything. Flying is now just the simple subtraction of distance. Step in a tube on one side in St. Louis, step out the other side in Shanghai--an ellipsis in between. It's still about sitting back back, maybe a little more relaxing, but a little less enjoying the flight.