List: eat in Canada 2018

Here's a list of places where we enjoyed eating during our trip to Canada...

Calgary

Banff

Victoria

Vancouver

What did I miss

Molson Canadian. Tim Hortons. Good night.

Now reading: The Power of Positive Deviance

Richard Tanner Pascale, Jerry Sternin, Monique Sternin, The Power of Positive Deviance: How Unlikely Innovators Solve the World's Toughest Problems (notes)

I don't remember exactly how I found this book. I think I was looking for another book on Safari Books Online and this one showed up in the search results or as a suggested book linked to whatever I was looking for. Doesn't matter. I saw this in the description and knew I had to read it:

In The Power of Positive Deviance, the authors present a counterintuitive new approach to problem-solving. Their advice? Leverage positive deviants--the few individuals in a group who find unique ways to look at, and overcome, seemingly insoluble difficulties. By seeing solutions where others don't, positive deviants spread and sustain needed change.

That's what I do. (How I see myself, at least.) Roundhouse kicks to the face of the status quo.

Unfortunately, reality

There is an almost irresistible temptation to choose one scenario over the other: to say, in effect, "This is the future which we believe will take place. The other futures are interesting. But they're irrelevant. We're going to follow this scenario." [...] Unfortunately, reality does not follow even the best-thought-out scenario. The point of scenario-planning is to help us suspend our disbelief in all the futures: to allow us to think that any one of them might take place. Then we can prepare for what we don't think is going to happen.

—Peter Schwartz, The Art Of The Long View: Planning For The Future In An Uncertain World, p. 195 (notes)

Rabbit hole: subway mysteries of New York

The other day I was looking something up on Wikipedia. And then I followed a link. And followed a link. And so on. You know how it goes.

This trip ended up in a completely different world: hidden subway stations in New York City. I had no idea. I wasn't looking for it. But after I learned about one—the never used lower Nevins Street station—I was hooked.

I'm just going to offer some links I found, sans context, and let you trip down the rabbit hole yourself. Enjoy.

Here's how I got there:
List of incidents of civil unrest in the United StatesKnow-Nothing RiotKnow Nothing movementBowery BoysThe BoweryProposed expansion of the New York City SubwayNevins Street station

Joseph B. Raskin, The Routes Not Taken: A Trip Through New York City's Unbuilt Subway System

WNYC: The Lost Subways of New York

Zoe Rosenberg, In an Abandoned Subway Tunnel, an Art Installation Condemning Gun Violence, Curbed, 2016-04-25

John Del Signore, Photos: Inside An Illegal Party In An Abandoned Subway Station Deep Under NYC, Gothamist, 2013-06-24

Control, The River Nevs, LTV Squad, 2007-11-25

"76th St. Station":

The Underbelly Project, South 4th St. Station:

Bradley L. Garrett, Place Hacking, 2012-01

A week in review, 2018-W30

Wrote

Read

Listened

Watched

The McKenzie Brothers - Take Off, Eh!, SCTV Archive

Upcoming

Dreams, shadow dancing

I'm reading a book called Shadow Dancing in the U.S.A (notes) by Michael Ventura. I found it by accident—via Peter Schwartz's The Art Of The Long View (notes), and that one itself via Tim O'Reilly's WTF?: What's the Future and Why It's Up to Us (notes). I like to follow the references—so many things out there I wouldn't even know to look for, let alone find. The book is from 1985, and it is a collection of essays reworked from his articles in the LA Weekly. Here's another thing I like: reading books that are separated from my own age by just a generation or two. It's interesting to feel the subterranean chill of a contemporaneous reference that may have been important at the time but has been buried just long enough to have been forgotten. It's easy to forget; it's easy not to know.

The fourth essay is called "The Big Chill Factor". Ventura himself has posted a copy here so you can read it. I think you should read it. The first third is a warmup, a kind of simmering annoyance about The Big Chill. (I've never seen it.) Then he cranks the dial and explains his recollections about growing up in the late 1960s and the subsequent comedown from all that energy. A Main Era. It's on par with that "high and beautiful wave" (chapter VIII) from the middle of Hunter S. Thompson's Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. Both Ventura's essay and Thompson's passage are savage, raw—these are people who held dreams in their hands and later watched them slip through their fingers like sand, and the experience burned a taunting image somewhere in their psyche that was so deep that it never went away. Like an afterimage from staring at the sun.

As it was all coming to an end I wrote a kind of note to myself which I wouldn’t read again until a long time later, a fragment of clarity on a cacophonous night: We know now that out dreams are not going to come true. Are never going to come true. We have learned that our dreams are important not because they come true, but because they take you places you would never have otherwise gone, and teach you what you never knew was there to learn.