Tag Archives: Bill Bryson

Drive across Ohio

In the morning I awoke early and experienced that sinking sensation that overcomes you when you first open your eyes and realize that instead of a normal day ahead of you, with its scatterings of simple gratifications, you are going to have a day without even the tiniest of pleasures; you are going to drive across Ohio.

—Bill Bryson. The Lost Continent: Travels in Small Town America.

Suggested reading, A Walk in the Woods

The following books were listed in the "Suggested Reading" of A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson:

  • Attenborough, David. The Private Life of Plants. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1995.
  • Bailyn, Bernard. Voyagers to the West: A Passage in the Peopling of America on the Eve of the Revolution. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1986.
  • Brooks, Maurice. The Appalachians. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co., 1986.
  • Bruce, Dan "Wingfoot." The Thru-Hiker's Handbook. Harpers Ferry, WV: Appalachian Trail Conference, 1995.
  • Cruikshank, Helen Gere, ed. John and William Bartram's America: Selections from the Writings of the Philadelphia Naturalists. New York: Devin-Adair Co., 1957.
  • Dale, Frank. Delaware Diary: Episodes in the Life of a River. New Brunswick, NH: Rutgers University Press, 1996.
  • Emblidge, David (ed.). The Appalachian Trail Reader. New York: Oxford University Press, 1997.
  • Faragher, John Mack. Daniel Boone: The Life and Legend of an American Pioneer. New York: Henry Holt and Col., 1993.
  • Farwell, Byron. Stonewall: A Biography of General Thomas J. Jackson. New York: W. W. Norton and Co., 1993.
  • Foreman, Dave, and Howie Wolke. The Big Outside: A Descriptive Inventory of the Big Wilderness Areas of the United States. New York: Harmony Books, 1992.
  • Herrero, Stephen. Bear Attacks: Their Causes and Avoidance. New York: Lyons and Burford, 1988.
  • Houk, Rose. Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Col, 1993.
  • Long, Priscilla. Where the Sun Never Shines: A History of America's Bloody Coal Industry. New York: Paragon House, 1991.
  • Luxenbourg, Larry. Walking the Appalachian Trail. Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania: Stackpole Books, 1994.
  • Matthiessen, Peter. Wildlife in America. New York: Penguin Books, 1995.
  • McKibben, Bill. The End of Nature. New York: Anchor, 1990.
  • McPhee, John. In Suspect Terrain. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1984.
  • Nash, Roderick. Wilderness and the American Mind. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1982.
  • Parker, Ronald B. Inscrutable Earth: Explorations into the Science of Earth. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1984.
  • Peattie, Donald Culross. A Natural History of Trees of Eastern and Central North America. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co., 1991.
  • Putnam, William Lowell. The Worst Weather on Earth: A History of the Mount Washington Observatory. New York: American Alpine Club, 1993.
  • Quammen, David. Natural Acts: A Sidelong View of Science and Nature. New York: Avon Books, 1996.
  • Schultz, Gwen. Ice Age Lost. New York: Anchor, 1974.
  • Shaffer, Earl V. Walking with Spring: The First Solo Thru-Hike of the Legendary Appalachian Trail. Harpers Ferry, WV: Appalachian Trail Conference, 1996.
  • Stier, Maggie, and Ron McAdow. Into the Mountains: Stories of New England's Most Celebrated Peaks. Boston: Appalachian Mountain Club Books, 1995.
  • Trefil, James. Meditations at 10,000 Feet: A Natural History of the Appalachians. New York: Macmillan, 1987.
  • Wilson, Edward O. The Diversity of Life. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press/Harvard University Press, 1992.

Grizzlies

All the books tell you that if the grizzly comes for you, on no account should you run. This is the sort of advice you get from someone who is sitting at a keyboard when he gives it. Take it from me, if you are in an open space with no weapons and a grizzly comes for you, run. You may as well. If nothing else, it will give you something to do with the last seven seconds of your life.

--Bill Bryson, "Chapter 2," A Walk in the Woods, p. 17, 1998.